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FairBnB - trying to be a more ethical alternative to AirBnB

#2
Hi Joe
Thanks for posting this - it very much looks like it addresses some major ethical failings of AirBnB
Regards
Ian
 
#3
It sounds like a 'first world' problem, but nonetheless, engaging with the main operators in holiday rental market has become a pain in the derriere.

This year's holiday, in Italy, was booked via Airbnb, and required a 50% deposit 6 months before arrival (December), which the property owner told us "I get paid when you arrive".

And there was an Airbnb 10% 'service fee', for a service that doesn't have a 'Contact us' e-mail address on its home page, and also sees fit to tamper with messages passing between client and customer, e.g., by removing contact details.

So, whilst I am happy to provide rental owners with longer reviews for their own use, on say their own web site, reviews for Airbnb's system are now only a begrudging sentence.

Finally, I presently cannot access my Airbnb account - my 'system' is not recognised, and the automated 'send a code to your phone' process did not work, even after several attempts.

Whether this is more of a relief than an annoyance is a moot point ...
 

joe

100+ Posts
#4
It sounds like a 'first world' problem, but nonetheless, engaging with the main operators in holiday rental market has become a pain in the derriere.
I agree that no rental booking is guaranteed to be problem-free, but I have seen that there are some things that can make an AirBnB booking a bit more positive :
1) book a place that is owned or operated by someone that meets you and is available during your stay (this can be learned from contact with the person pre-booking, or through reviews by previous guests)
2) go for places that have lenient cancellation policies - this does restrict the choice sometimes, but is usually worth the peace of mind
3) I always offer to exchange e-mails (after the stay is over, personally with the host) and suggest that if there will be a next time, we try to book directly, and not through the site. This can save money for both sides. Unfortunately, I don't travel enough that I have had the opportunity to offer this for a place I have been before.

As much as AirBnB has become big and negative in some of its impacts, it still deserves credit for shaking the industry and offering a service that was not provided before. I will continue to use it if needed, although I'm hoping that something like this "FairBnB" will shake things up again. Many small property owners have made some extra income, and slow travellers like us have found a way to have a temporary home in good locations, at usually reasonable prices.
 
#5
"As much as AirBnB has become big and negative in some of its impacts, it still deserves credit for shaking the industry and offering a service that was not provided before them."

I feel likewise about Homelidays, subsequently acquired by HomeAway.

But the gold-diggers have since moved in - 'adding value' (for themselves), via overwhelming market domination - and the time has probably come for the market to reciprocate.

Anyone for a gilet jaune ? ;-)
 

Mark

100+ Posts
#6
Just wondering why AirBnB gets all of the negative press. What about VRBO/HomeAway. Some properties are on both sites as well. I used VRBO almost exclusively until they raised their service fees a few years back.
 
#7
Hi Mark
Taxation for sure, as I believe both the others are straight up about ensuring taxes are paid.
Regards
Ian
 

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