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Israel Questions

Jane

10+ Posts
Pauline, I know you and Steve are loving Israel. It is taking me a while to read through your phenomenal reports. We will only be there for 3 weeks and will really be focused on the biblical sites but we do have a couple days in Tel Aviv and three in Jerusalem on our own. Nothing closely resembling what you have done. Once I read through your reports, I will know what I should ask you. To begin with I guess I’d love some advice as to Tel Aviv and what to do there I c,using where you would recommend location wise for a hotel. I guess I should clarify that we are on a tour for 15 days…says she who has avoided tours forever. It just seemed this might be a place to travel with a historian. We will be there in late February and early March
 

Pauline

Forums Admin
Hi Jane! Yes, we love traveling in Israel! The biblical sites are amazing. We have seen many of the Christian sites now, but there are so many more. We will be there in November.

In Tel Aviv on our first trip we stayed at the Melody Hotel, across from the seaside, near the large hotels. This is a good area. The boardwalk along the sea is nice and stretches along most of the downtown. The main shopping streets are just a few blocks away.

On our second trip we stayed in Nev Tsdek (can’t remember how to spell that), south of the downtown before you get to Jaffa, and I don’t recommend it. Too hip and young and too much construction.

I saw a lovely hotel on Rothschild Boulevard when we were there and thought that might be nice. I will find the name. The Melody was nice, but small rooms. Anything from Rothschild to the sea would be good.

Lots to do in Tel Aviv. The market is crowded but fabulous. I liked walking around the city. There are good museums but I don’t think we went to any.

Here is the hotel I saw in Tel Aviv. I don't know anything about it, but it is a nice location and looked nice. There are some huge hotels in Tel Aviv, because of all the large tours that come to Israel, and you may want to avoid those just because they would be so busy.

The Rothschild Hotel and Bistro

tel-aviv-4841.jpg
 

Jane

10+ Posts
Thanks, Pauline. It is so good to be in touch again. I’ll check out your ideas. I really like the photo of the hotel so will look at it right now. Please pass along any ideas you have. Particularly Tel Aviv and Jerusalem. Hi to Steve. W dare tho king of taking one of Kathy's England tour so maybe we'll see you. Operative word, thinking about it. LOL
 

joe

500+ Posts
I think that if you're in Tel Aviv for only a day or two, you might benefit from first deciding what you're interested in seeing, and then looking for a nearby accommodation. The city is best experienced on foot, and you are going there at a reasonable time with respect to weather. So if you are able physically, you could reach your selected attractions by just walking to them. Public transportation is far from optimal (and non-existent on Saturdays), and I don't know if you like to be dependent on taxis. And if you are willing to stay not only in a hotel but in a short-term rental, there is no lack of accommodations spread out in the city.

Being a relatively young city, there are no major landmarks, but rather a nice variety of attractions that can be sampled in a short time. Any good website will list them.
A new "White City Center", an institute dedicated to Bauhaus architecture (for which Tel Aviv is known and has been recognized by UNESCO), will be inaugurated in a month (on Idelson Street).

The city has a great vibe to it and is very beautiful in parts. The beach promenade, markets, museums, gastronomy, architecture and historical sites all have their appeal, and Pauline has described some of these in her reports. People are friendly and usually speak English fairly well. Although, as I have said to Pauline, just remember that this is still the Middle East, so be prepared to see shabbiness and filth as well. And watch out for the electric scooters on the sidewalks - the transportation infrastructure is severely lacking.
 

Jane

10+ Posts
I think that if you're in Tel Aviv for only a day or two, you might benefit from first deciding what you're interested in seeing, and then looking for a nearby accommodation. The city is best experienced on foot, and you are going there at a reasonable time with respect to weather. So if you are able physically, you could reach your selected attractions by just walking to them. Public transportation is far from optimal (and non-existent on Saturdays), and I don't know if you like to be dependent on taxis. And if you are willing to stay not only in a hotel but in a short-term rental, there is no lack of accommodations spread out in the city.

Being a relatively young city, there are no major landmarks, but rather a nice variety of attractions that can be sampled in a short time. Any good website will list them.
A new "White City Center", an institute dedicated to Bauhaus architecture (for which Tel Aviv is known and has been recognized by UNESCO), will be inaugurated in a month (on Idelson Street).

The city has a great vibe to it and is very beautiful in parts. The beach promenade, markets, museums, gastronomy, architecture and historical sites all have their appeal, and Pauline has described some of these in her reports. People are friendly and usually speak English fairly well. Although, as I have said to Pauline, just remember that this is still the Middle East, so be prepared to see shabbiness and filth as well. And watch out for the electric scooters on the sidewalks - the transportation infrastructure is severely lacking.
Thanks, Joe. You have outlined
I think that if you're in Tel Aviv for only a day or two, you might benefit from first deciding what you're interested in seeing, and then looking for a nearby accommodation. The city is best experienced on foot, and you are going there at a reasonable time with respect to weather. So if you are able physically, you could reach your selected attractions by just walking to them. Public transportation is far from optimal (and non-existent on Saturdays), and I don't know if you like to be dependent on taxis. And if you are willing to stay not only in a hotel but in a short-term rental, there is no lack of accommodations spread out in the city.

Being a relatively young city, there are no major landmarks, but rather a nice variety of attractions that can be sampled in a short time. Any good website will list them.
A new "White City Center", an institute dedicated to Bauhaus architecture (for which Tel Aviv is known and has been recognized by UNESCO), will be inaugurated in a month (on Idelson Street).

The city has a great vibe to it and is very beautiful in parts. The beach promenade, markets, museums, gastronomy, architecture and historical sites all have their appeal, and Pauline has described some of these in her reports. People are friendly and usually speak English fairly well. Although, as I have said to Pauline, just remember that this is still the Middle East, so be prepared to see shabbiness and filth as well. And watch out for the electric scooters on the sidewalks - the transportation infrastructure is severely lacking.
 

Jane

10+ Posts
Thanks, Joe, for the insights. We are mostly interested in proximity of sites in terms of walking and where to tase. We are researching this and appreciate your thoughts. I think I can google a lot of this and see distances between. We've been to several Africa and Middle East countries so won't be surprised by what we might see.
 

Jane

10+ Posts
Thanks and more thanks for this article. I just perused it and will devour it when I have more time. It really clarifies some things in my mind. More later. Off to church now.
 

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