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Suggestions and advice for Turin

Tim W

100+ Posts
#1
I'm heading out to Turin at the weekend, and am very excited about the trip, but have not managed to do the amount of research I really needed - so at the risk of being accused of laziness, I have a few questions for the experts.
1) Transport from the airport: I believe are buses to Porta Nuova, or I can get as far a the Dora station by train and then on by bus. I believe there is a 72 hour ticket available, that is contactless - does anybody know if this is smartphone only or can I buy a physical ticket? Does this ticket cover the train to Dora station?

2) I arrive around 9:30, and cannot get into my apartment until 3. I will only have a relatively light backpack - but this will probably stop me getting into museums or exhibitions - I sort of intended just walking around the city centre (weather permitting) for a couple of hours - does anybody have any suggestions for a light lunch.

3) Restaurant recommendations - I've already noted Ian's suggestion of Piazza dei Mestieri, but any other advice welcomed - we generally eat out at inexpensive local places - so under €50 for two - but are happy to have at least one or two splurges.

4) Does anybody have experience of apericena in Turin? I am more of a beer drinker that cocktails - although do enjoy a glass of red - am I going to be limited as per choices? How do these places generally work?

5) Finally, daytrips - we will be using strictly public transport - I will probably want to leave Milan for a proper visit (I've not been before) - Aosta seems a reasonable choice, but maybe 2.5 hours each way by public transport, so too far? I've seen Cuneo mentioned - any other suggestions?

Thanks for any advice

Tim
 
#2
In case the weather is not conducive to walking around the city, the Egyptian Museum can easily take up several hours. You will store your backpack in a locker; I don’t remember the fee precisely, but it was not high. Between our February 2016 and October 2017 visits, a new director took over and changed the exhibits. We thought it was much better the second time. If you have any interest in Egyptology do not miss; I believe this is the third largest collection in the world.

Il Museo Egizio is only a few blocks from Le Vitel Etonné. We thought their vitello tonnato was outstanding.

Torino is the birthplace of vermouth. Many of the cafes in the city center have large collections if you want to do a tasting.

There is a local train line to Alba, a journey of about an hour and a quarter. One of the stops is in Bra, the birthplace of Slow Food. The 2018 Alba White Truffle Festival opens on October 6, but there are still things to see in Alba even without the festival. Interestingly, on Chowhound there are strong, mostly negative, opinions about eating there.

We’ve only been to Torino twice, but it is one of our favorite cities. Enjoy!
 

joe

100+ Posts
#3
From Malpensa airport to Torino : we used the Sadem line bus in 2008, it was a 2 and a half hour route that lets you off at Porta Nuova and Porta Susa (at least then). The price today is 22 E. - the bus stop is conveniently right outside the terminal.
http://www.sadem.it/media/5191/000020.pdf

If you have a few hours on the first day, you might want to go up the Mole Antonelliana (in the same building as the Museum of Cinema, but can be visited separately) - the best observation point of the city. If you get off at Porta Nuova, you could precede the Mole with a walk through Piazza San Carlo and Piazza Castello, turning south-east on Via Po in the direction of the Mole and the Po river.

Torino is a vibrant and beautiful city.
 
#4
Hi Tim
Some suggestions below in blue

I'm heading out to Turin at the weekend, and am very excited about the trip, but have not managed to do the amount of research I really needed - so at the risk of being accused of laziness, I have a few questions for the experts.
1) Transport from the airport: I believe are buses to Porta Nuova, or I can get as far a the Dora station by train and then on by bus. I believe there is a 72 hour ticket available, that is contactless - does anybody know if this is smartphone only or can I buy a physical ticket? Does this ticket cover the train to Dora station? Yes, both options exist, but Stazione Dora really only of use if staying north of the city. SITA run the blue buses that stop at Stazione Porta Susa and Stazione Porta Nuova. Buy tickets from the kiosk inside the arrivals hall then had outside and turn to your right and in the central section of the two lanes you'll find the bus stop. There was a started up, so worth looking at their route map to see if it's more convenient).

There are one day, two day, 3 day tickets but this won't cover the SITA buses and I suspect not the train to Staz. Dora. When in the city we've tended to have days without many trams/buses and then we'll buy a one day (giornaliero) ticket to travel around more. There are 10 ticket carnets and I'm not surprised contactless has arrived (I've not used it there). GTT (Gruppor trasporto Torinese) is the website with all the details including the amazing route map.

2) I arrive around 9:30, and cannot get into my apartment until 3. I will only have a relatively light backpack - but this will probably stop me getting into museums or exhibitions - I sort of intended just walking around the city centre (weather permitting) for a couple of hours - does anybody have any suggestions for a light lunch. All manner of places, from bars selling panini, through pizzerie (e.g. the vibrant Spaccanaopoli) and so on. Some of the wine bars can be great for a light lunch and an excuse to linger longer e.g. Tre Galline up near Piazza della Repubblica, Vitel Etonné just off via Po, RossoRubino (they've moved, I think nearer the river). Also oodles of restaurants.

3) Restaurant recommendations - I've already noted Ian's suggestion of Piazza dei Mestieri, but any other advice welcomed - we generally eat out at inexpensive local places - so under €50 for two - but are happy to have at least one or two splurges. I'm not sure if I've mentioned TAVERNA DELL'OCA, 24, v. Dei Mille tel: 011 837547 which is a favourite understated place not far from Staz. Porta Nuova.

4) Does anybody have experience of apericena in Turin? I am more of a beer drinker that cocktails - although do enjoy a glass of red - am I going to be limited as per choices? How do these places generally work? For aperitivo, it's typically whatever they sell, with either a plate of nibbles or a help yourself buffet, so find a place that has the drinks you like and you'll be fine. Enoteca Bordo, Via Antonio Gramsci, 3 I've got listed as stocking artisan beers and there are some great / innovative local beers. Piazza dei Mestieri have their original pub (plus upstairs restaurant), plus a place in the city (though FWIW I found the service / food a bit apathetic on our visit there). Worth searching google maps for Birreria, Brewpub, Birrateca plus Torino and see what comes up. Should also be plenty of places serving cocktails.

5) Finally, daytrips - we will be using strictly public transport - I will probably want to leave Milan for a proper visit (I've not been before) - Aosta seems a reasonable choice, but maybe 2.5 hours each way by public transport, so too far? I've seen Cuneo mentioned - any other suggestions? Stuninigi / Veneria Reale are probably more summer options. The Alba truffle festival is probably a week away, but when on there are direct trains and it's very popular. Asti worth a thought, though Novara is an under the radar place worth considering.
Ivrea is a compact place in the foothills of the Alps, and * La Mugnaia, via Arduino 53 Tel: 0125 40530 Modern minimalist restaurant closed Mondays, open on weekends for lunch and dinner, otherwise dinner only. It was great and rather inexpensive for what would be a blowout/classy meal elsewhere.
Basilica di Superga is on the northern outskirts of Torino, so makes for a very easy day trip, taking in the rather steep rack railway up there.


Thanks for any advice

Tim
 
#6
Hi Tim
This page might interest - Piemontese breweries to look out for their beers whilst there
http://www.lestradedellabirra.com/birrifici/piemonte/

If wanting a selection to take home, then I sometimes criticise it as a 'supermarket', but it's an exceptional supermarket - Eataly on via Nizza 230. Either take the Metro to Spezia stop, or the 1, 18 or 35 bus/tram to Spezia or the following Biglieri stop (all bus/tram stops have a name, which is helpful). The beer selection is downstairs with the wines and it's a wide selection. Also possible to stop there for a beer and some food, and of the 'fast' food options at Eataly it's one of the least worst (how they get this so impersonally wrong in the other places to grab a bite in Eataly I don't know - fast food served slow and with a fed-up attitude). The ingredients are often good, but my is the delivery poor. At least the beer area has a cosy feel.

Ones I've tried and really enjoyed are Baladin, Loverbeer, Birrificio San Michele
Birrificio La Piazza aren't bad at all, but I find the above especially interesting and wonderful at the dinner table. Plenty of others on that link I've not tried, but would happily explore.

Also worth checking turismotorino tourist office site, as on occasions they organise visits to local producers / artisans, including Birrificio Torino.

Regards
Ian
 
#8
There is a local train line to Alba, a journey of about an hour and a quarter. One of the stops is in Bra, the birthplace of Slow Food. The 2018 Alba White Truffle Festival opens on October 6, but there are still things to see in Alba even without the festival. Interestingly, on Chowhound there are strong, mostly negative, opinions about eating there.
FWIW I've not been lucky in Alba, but with the over-popularity of the truffle festival, and that's often been when we've been there, I can't honestly dismiss the place. It's no time to pass judgement when the tourist hordes are there, and many restaurants are either already fully booked, or overworked. Oddly our first meal there, at a fairly basic cafe/bar/cafeteria was actual rather decent. A simple pasta dish with black truffle. Simple, done well.
 

Tim W

100+ Posts
#11
"Where are you staying, Tim? "

I'm not absolutely sure of the exact neighbourhood. Seems we are east of Parella and west of San Donato. We have an attic studio flat that I found on AirBnB. Its about half a mile northeast of the Monte Grappa metro stop. Its very small with a severely sloping roof - but really pleasant and well kitted out.

This is our third day here - and I must say I am impressed - a very elegant city. We were blessed with two glorious days of weather on the weekend, and as a result may have overdone the walking - I thinw we approached 15 miles yesterday. Today it has been raining, and being Monday, the museum opening ours have been limited - so we went down to Eataly. Who knew that there could be so much shelf space dedicated to capers!

Overall having a marvelous time, and we've not really done anything yet. I'll put together a trip report as soon as I have anything worth reporting.
 

Tim W

100+ Posts
#12
Just to tidy up this thread, and answer one of my own questions so anybody reading this later has the answers.

"1) Transport from the airport: I believe are buses to Porta Nuova, or I can get as far a the Dora station by train"

The trains from the airport to Stazione Dora seemed few and far between at the time of our arrival on a Saturday. Once you arrive , there is no obvious ticket machine at the Dora station from which to buy a travel card. We could only find the Sadem bus from the airport to town - €6

All metro stations have multi language ticket machines, from which you can buy individual and multi day tickets. Although they appear to be cardboard, the multi day tickets are contactless - and worked very well.
 
#13
I've just updated the google map I created 'Torino food explorer', to re-cut the layers by geographical location rather than type (but the tags still colour code type). I dare say it will get updated with changes since our last visit, as places move/close/open/I find them.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=16vEDEEfgTKAfe9hb-3kwL3DWDBA&usp=sharing

After trying it out last time we visited, I figured it would be easier to use this way, even to the point it might make it possible to print a layer, rather than solely usable on phone/tablet.
 

joe

100+ Posts
#14
I've just updated the google map I created 'Torino food explorer'.
Thanks very much Ian for the time invested and the posting. That's a great resource for people like us, who like to do the rounds on all the food shops wherever we are in Italy.

A few places you might like to check out next time you're there, which I believe aren't on your map :

Gelato Alberto Marchetti : https://www.albertomarchetti.it/casamarchetti

Artisanal Chocolate :
Guido Gobino - http://guidogobino.it/
La Perla di Torino - http://www.laperladitorino.it/?lang=en

These businesses were right by our apt. in Torino when we visited there two years ago (just north-east of Ponte Rossini), so we got to experience all three. It appears that Marchetti has since closed the shop in that neighborhood, but opened two or three others in Torino, in better locations. I can see how just in the span of two years he has been very successful, also by the upgrade to his website, which now includes mention of the praise and acclaims he has been receiving.

The chocolate places were our source for the dolci souvenirs we brought back. Simply amazing - the chocolatiers in Piemonte keep you wide-eyed no matter where you encounter them.
 
Last edited:
#15
Hi Joe
Many thanks for that. Always happy to have a gelato recommendation, as despite having established some favourites in various places, it's often we'll pass nearby one that looks interesting (or find ourselves fancying one), and nice to try them out. I must have walked past the via Po one a number of times (and slightly less the Corso Vittorio Emanuele II shop), so I'll give them a try next time we're there (I've added the via Po one, as it's the most convenient of the locations).

La Perla are one of the few that make it over here, so I've never sought them out in Torino. I think they decent, especially so for being a more substantial / commercial operation than many in Torino. Plenty of variety in their Gianduja offerings.

Gobino ought to be on the list, as there is quality, artisanal apporach and they appear to be run very professionally. Their absence is just a personal feeling that I've yet to be excited by them. They'd certainly be worth people trying and it was perhaps selfish of me to leave them off :sorry:

Regards
Ian
 

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