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List of Italian Pharmacies Which Offer Covid ANTIGEN Test for 15 Euros

GAC

10+ Posts
The Italian Government has stipulated an accord with participating pharmacies to provide a Covid-19 ANTIGEN (quick) test for a fixed cost of 15 Euros for adults and 8 Euros for children between ages 12 and 18. (The Government pays pharmacies a subsidy of 7 Euros for tests to minors).

Over 50% of Italian pharmacies have adhered to this plan, and the list is growing. The accord gets extended from time to time.

Tourists who are not fully vaccinated or who do not have a recovery certificate (recovery from the virus) may need to have an antigen test performed in order to take certain public transportation in Italy (e.g. reserved trains, inter-regional buses or ferries), or dine in INDOOR restaurants, or enter museums or many other cultural or entertainment sites, or to return to their home countries (make sure that a molecular test is not required in the latter case).

Here is a list of participating pharmacies, current as of 23 September 2021:

https://gsud.cdn-immedia.net/2021/09/23092021DGC_Elenco_Farmacie_Aderenti.pdf

Information on the cost-sharing accord:


Remember that children UNDER AGE 12 are EXEMPTED from all green pass requirements ONCE ARRIVED in Italy. This means that they do NOT need a Covid test (or vaccination) to take certain public transportation (reserved trains, etc.), dine in INDOOR restaurants, visit museums and other venues which otherwise require a green pass, use gyms or swimming pools, etc. Conversely, children age 12 and above must comply with green pass requirements.

This is to be DISTINGUISHED from the Italian ENTRY regulations which DO require testing of children age 6 and above arriving in Italy from List "D" or "E" countries (irrespective of vaccination status), or from List "C" countries who are not fully vaccinated.

Here is a partial list of venues which require a green pass (or equivalent) for entry:

COVID-19 DIGITAL GREEN CERTIFICATE TRAVEL AND ACCESS TO CULTURAL AND RECREATIONAL EVENTS​


In Italy, the COVID-19 green certificate facilitates attendance at certain public events (such as trade fairs, concerts, sports competitions, parties following religious or civil ceremonies) and access to health care facilities for the elderly (RSA). It is also mandatory when moving into and out of areas that may be classified as "red" or "orange" zones in the absence of valid reasons for work, health or proven urgency.

Persons over the age of 12 must present a COVID-19 digital green pass in order to access certain services and activities:

  • Travelling by air, train (EXCEPT UNRESERVED TRAINS), ship, ferry or bus (except wholly intra-regional services) throughout Italy (local transportation is exempted)
  • Restaurants, bars, ice cream parlours and pastry shops for consumption at table indoors
  • Performances open to the public, sporting events, both outdoors and indoors
  • Museums and places of culture, shows
  • Swimming pools and gyms
  • Private parties, such as wedding receptions
  • Festivals and trade fairs
  • Conventions and congresses
  • Spas and fitness centres
  • Gaming halls and betting shops, bingo halls and casinos
Access to these services and activities is allowed on presenting the EU Digital COVID Certificate or an equivalent certificate issued by the health authorities of Canada, Japan, Israel, the United Kingdom and the United States. (Note: this has been extended to official vaccination certificates issued by most foreign countries)


Here is a more complete list of venues requiring the green pass (Italian only):

(look under the heading "Informazioni generali: quali sono le attivita' e i servizi in Italia dove e' richiesta la certificazione verde Covid-19?")
 
Last edited:

italian excursion

100+ Posts
My experience traveling the past month in Italy regarding the above information, which I'll write in bullets, boring but easier for me to quantify:

1) In preparation for traveling to Europe I had a Covid PCR test 3 days before departure by a reputable lab with an onsite pathologist and filled out the online EU "locator" form. Once I filled out this form I received a reply in acknowledgment of receipt with a QR code. Of course I carried my vaccination card along with my passport and International driver's license everywhere I went.

2) I entered Europe from the US via Lisbon, Portugal as I flew on TAP Portugal (loved the experience with TAP), where all of the above documents were reviewed upon entry. It took only a few minutes as there was virtually no line!

3) Upon entering Italy at FCO, Rome and with no luggage to collect I sailed right through the airport to meet my ride out front, no stopping, no reviewing by local staff, nothing! My assumption being that the first entry was enough, but I was quite surprised nonetheless.

4) Having gotten in late day I opted to stay overnight in Fumicino, where I have a favorite B & B, so I could rest and take the train north the following morning. My host took a quick look at my vaccination card and that was that.

5) I took the train the following morning up to Orvieto where Luigi's son, Andrea met me to pick up the rental car at their shop. Andrea didn't ask for my green card but I did offer it. We masked up in the ride to pick up my rental car. Then I took off to my B & B in Cononica, near Porano, outside of Orvieto. My friends didn't ask to see my credentials as we know each other and had already determined we were "safe". They live on a farm and spent most of the last 18 months isolated, not leaving their property.

6) The weather was temperate most of the time I was in Italy (except for a few stormy times, mostly at night) so I ate many of my restaurant meals outdoors. About 50% of the establishments asked to see my green card but 98% of the time all the staff wore masks. It wasn't until I was in the south, in Basilicata region, that there were several bars in one of the towns that staff were unmasked. We didn't go in. One lunch in that same town, where we ate outside, the family cooking and serving did not wear masks, either.

7) Shops and bars were far more lenient about asking for the green pass but all staff in shops/bars wore masks, as did shoppers. When I stopped to get gas or use the restroom at rest stops everyone inside wore masks. No one seemed the least bit bothered by it or rebellious. Outside of course, many people removed them.

8) I stayed with friends, in a hotel once and in a couple of B & B's. The hotel staff wore masks all of the time. There was hand sanitizer in every door to every establishment. The Italians are nearly 80% fully vaccinated. They care about their communities and each other and I heard wonderful stories of how small communities helped each other through the lockdowns. One small enclave of 100 people in La Garfagnana, where I visited a friend, had just one Alimentari and a bar. The owners of the shop told the village they would go out to get all the supplies each week so no one in town had to leave their home. They then set up a delivery system/time for distribution. This wasn't a unique story, either as I heard it a couple more times.

9) When it was time for me to leave for home I had a choice of where and which Covid test to take within 48 hours of departure. The lab in town charged 80 euro for the PCR test; the farmacia, 20 euro for the antigen test, both of which my airline approved. I chose the latter as I'd already done a self test and I had no symptoms. I made my appointment 3 days before departure for 2 days out. A doctor administered the test in his office around the corner from the farmacia. Negative!

10) The airline checked my health documents at check-in, and 2 other times before boarding. On board the first leg of the journey I was asked to fill out a simple, short one page form which was the EU locator form, same as I'd filled out online before traveling. When I showed them the QR on my phone the attendant said I still needed to fill out this form, which I noticed later when into a folder with other paper forms. The woman across the isle had filled hers out online before boarding, which was an option, however I didn't realize I'd need to fill out that form from both before and after my trip. Who knows what the airlines do with all the paper!!!

In conclusion, traveling to that country was not nearly as anxiety producing as I had imagined some months ago. And the only complaint I had about the entire trip was when I entered the US at SFO. It was the most disorganized, unfriendly environment of all the airports I'd been. It made me a bit sad to see the staff looking so worn down, the lines so long, inefficient and chaotic. I believe it was just understaffed as there were only 2 lanes opened when there were about 7 available. The heartening part was that the travelers, some tired from long travel, others just starting out, were all very cooperative, uncomplaining and patient. I think we all realized that the staff was suffering and so we just did our best to cooperate. It also my pleasure to report that no one on any of my flights caused a fuss about masking up!!!

I will add that I was quite impressed with the entry into Portugal not just the airline. It's a place I've got on my list to visit so it will now move to the top of the list. Hopefully, this is useful information. I've nothing to add about any of the other european countries and encourage anyone who has traveled elsewhere to post those experiences. (I did hear from some British friends that there is quite a bit of difficulty in GB as far as travel and supply chain issues).

Ciao tutti!
Cheryl
www.italianexcursion.com
 

GailS

100+ Posts
We've had no issues using our CDC cards + drivers license as photo ID in place of a green pass in Venice and Florence (including at a restaurant 45 minutes in the hills outside of Florence). Only one waitress first said she didn't know what they were and couldn't accept them but when we said we would find the Italian Ministry of Health site that showed them, and took our the phone to load it, she went into the restaurant and checked with somebody else who was aware of them. On the high speed train the agent even asked for the vaccination certificate instead of Green Pass after showing the Italo App in English with our tickets. While we've preferred to eat outside it's starting to get a bit cool in Venice this week to eat out for dinner unless the restaurant has good heaters near the table.
 

artnbarb

1000+ Posts
The Italian Government has stipulated an accord with participating pharmacies to provide a Covid-19 ANTIGEN (quick) test for a fixed cost of 15 Euros for adults and 8 Euros for children between ages 12 and 18. (The Government pays pharmacies a subsidy of 7 Euros for tests to minors).

Over 50% of Italian pharmacies have adhered to this plan, and the list is growing. The accord gets extended from time to time.

Tourists who are not fully vaccinated or who do not have a recovery certificate (recovery from the virus) may need to have an antigen test performed in order to take certain public transportation in Italy (e.g. reserved trains, inter-regional buses or ferries), or dine in INDOOR restaurants, or enter museums or many other cultural or entertainment sites, or to return to their home countries (make sure that a molecular test is not required in the latter case).

Here is a list of participating pharmacies, current as of 23 September 2021:

https://gsud.cdn-immedia.net/2021/09/23092021DGC_Elenco_Farmacie_Aderenti.pdf

Information on the cost-sharing accord:


Remember that children UNDER AGE 12 are EXEMPTED from all green pass requirements ONCE ARRIVED in Italy. This means that they do NOT need a Covid test (or vaccination) to take certain public transportation (reserved trains, etc.), dine in INDOOR restaurants, visit museums and other venues which otherwise require a green pass, use gyms or swimming pools, etc. Conversely, children age 12 and above must comply with green pass requirements.

This is to be DISTINGUISHED from the Italian ENTRY regulations which DO require testing of children age 6 and above arriving in Italy from List "D" or "E" countries (irrespective of vaccination status), or from List "C" countries who are not fully vaccinated.

Here is a partial list of venues which require a green pass (or equivalent) for entry:

COVID-19 DIGITAL GREEN CERTIFICATE TRAVEL AND ACCESS TO CULTURAL AND RECREATIONAL EVENTS​


In Italy, the COVID-19 green certificate facilitates attendance at certain public events (such as trade fairs, concerts, sports competitions, parties following religious or civil ceremonies) and access to health care facilities for the elderly (RSA). It is also mandatory when moving into and out of areas that may be classified as "red" or "orange" zones in the absence of valid reasons for work, health or proven urgency.

Persons over the age of 12 must present a COVID-19 digital green pass in order to access certain services and activities:

  • Travelling by air, train (EXCEPT UNRESERVED TRAINS), ship, ferry or bus (except wholly intra-regional services) throughout Italy (local transportation is exempted)
  • Restaurants, bars, ice cream parlours and pastry shops for consumption at table indoors
  • Performances open to the public, sporting events, both outdoors and indoors
  • Museums and places of culture, shows
  • Swimming pools and gyms
  • Private parties, such as wedding receptions
  • Festivals and trade fairs
  • Conventions and congresses
  • Spas and fitness centres
  • Gaming halls and betting shops, bingo halls and casinos
Access to these services and activities is allowed on presenting the EU Digital COVID Certificate or an equivalent certificate issued by the health authorities of Canada, Japan, Israel, the United Kingdom and the United States. (Note: this has been extended to official vaccination certificates issued by most foreign countries)


Here is a more complete list of venues requiring the green pass (Italian only):

(look under the heading "Informazioni generali: quali sono le attivita' e i servizi in Italia dove e' richiesta la certificazione verde Covid-19?")
Thanks for posting this information.
 

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