• Click CONTACT US in the footer if you have any problems registering for the forums.

Sweden seems to have got it right....

joe

500+ Posts
From The Guardian, a report on the current situation in Sweden with regards Covid. Although they made a big mistake in the spring in not paying enough attention to what was happening in the homes for the elderly, they were not alone in this. However, they managed not to impose a full lockdown, and relied on certain measures that made their policy more sustainable :

"Unlike many countries, Sweden closed schools for the over-16s but kept those for younger pupils open, insisting on full attendance. Schools and universities are now open again.

It also banned gatherings of more than 50 people and told people over 70 and in at-risk groups to self-isolate.

Otherwise, the population of 10 million was asked, rather than ordered, to respect physical distancing and work from home if possible, which it largely did. Shops, bars, restaurants and gyms stayed open and the wearing of masks has not so far been recommended.

Tegnell has insisted the aim was not to achieve rapid herd immunity but to slow the spread of coronavirus enough for health services to be able to cope. He has also, however, consistently said Sweden’s strategy may prove more sustainable long-term.
"

Here in Israel we are entering a second lockdown, that could easily have been prevented with proper leadership and management, and it seems that there might be second lockdowns on the horizon for a few other countries.
 

Pauline

Forums Admin
I agree with the way Sweden handled the virus. I still find it hard to believe that countries closed borders and ordered people to stay in their homes. At least in the UK they paid working people to stay home. But now they keep changing the regulations and no one is sure what they are supposed to be doing.

No Israel in November for us because the borders will probably be closed.
 

NoSpin

100+ Posts
Pauline, I respectfully disagree with the way Sweden handled the virus. They have experienced 5865 deaths in a population of 10.1 million, for a rate of 5.8%. Compare this to its two bordering neighbors. Norway with a population of 5.4 million has 267 deaths, .49% death rate. Finland has a population of 5.5 million with 341 deaths, .6% death rate.

I shudder to think if Trump had his way in the US and we followed Sweden's model, we could be looking at over 19 million deaths at that 5.8% rate. It probably would never get to that, but things would have been considerably worse in my opinion.

OK, I'll get off my soapbox. :)
 

Ian Sutton

500+ Posts
Hi Paul
I very much agree with you.

It is possible, that when all the numbers are totted up at the end, it might be that encouraging the virus to propagate through spring and summer might turn out to be the best strategy, but that would be a reckless assumption to have made, when so much was unknown. At the moment their approach has clearly cost lives. We don't know the end result yet though.

... and on a lighter note, a friend from Finland says she's looking forward to the relaxation of social distancing limits, as they're not used to keeping a mere 2 metres apart.
 

Sponsors

Booking.com Hotels in Europe
AutoEurope.com Car Rentals

New resources

Top