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Israel Four weeks in Israel, November 2019

Pauline

Forums Admin
Yes, not that I have any special insight but I'm not questioning whether it's safe or not where you are or in most of Israel. I just worry for my cousins' kids, most of whom are of age to be called up from reserves. And because the sirens in the Tel Aviv area were frightening for the young grandchildren.

I am not worried about us. Mitzpe is close but there is no reason for them to aim here and Zichron where we go Sunday is far enough north I think. I might be worried in Tel Aviv, but we are not going there.
 

joe

500+ Posts
You are lucky to see the cisterns full of water - they were probably dry until the end of October, when a lot of rain fell over this area (the night of 26-27th).
Maybe on one of your next visits you can be in the desert parts of the country later on in winter, or early spring, and you might be able to see the flowering display that this desert can (sometimes) put on.

BTW the pistachio tree you saw is not the same species as the one we all know of with the edible nuts. The one in this part of the desert is the Pistacia atlantica. They are protected in Israel, some of them are hundreds of years old.

The woman in the full burka was probably Bedouin - when you exit Mitzpeh to the north you will see their small villages and encampments.

The Jewish religious women with the turbans are just sort of Jewish-nationalist, as opposed to the ultra-orthodox (Haredi), not necessarily of any sect. They don't have any problem living alongside or even amongst secular Jews, although of course they will prefer neighborhoods with a more religious population. Secular neighborhoods are quite wary of potential increases in the number of residents that are more religious, for fear that the character of the neighborhood could change for "worse".

The Marrakesh Hummus place is relatively new, not more than a year perhaps. Lasha is indeed a great bakery.

You're right, there is a nice vibe to the town. Too bad it hasn't managed to develop to its full potential over the years - you saw how empty the "Spice Quarter" is. There was a very good cafe there, but it closed, and there are very few small businesses that manage to hold out.
 
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Pauline

Forums Admin
Friday November 15 2019 - Mitzpe Ramon
Sun and cloud, cooler, 68 F

Back to Lasha Bakery in the morning. We arrived at a quiet period and one of the women working there had time to explain things. Three types of Challah - regular, wreath with rosemary, half wholewheat with seeds. We got the last one and it was really good. Several different savoury pastries. We got one that is Sabich (egg and eggplant), one Shakshukka (egg and spicy tomato sauce) and a Polish style with onion. The Sabich we shared for lunch. It was like a pasty, folded over. The others for dinner. They were like focaccia, like the ones we had yesterday. All very good. Many people came in as we were leaving. Others were outside having coffee at the tables.

It was cooler today. Still sunny but with a few clouds. We went to the small market in front of the supermarket. There were a lot of fruit and vegetables, a great selection. All one vendor and I don’t know if any was from Israel farms. I can’t see that much would grow around here but a lot grows in greenhouses in other parts of the Negev. We picked up a few things. People were taking a box and loading it up with what looked like produce for the week.

Around noon we drove down into the crater and saw one of the main sites, the Carpentry. A hill with rocks formed like bricks. From there we took a trail and walked out for an hour (slightly uphill), had lunch, then walked back (4 miles). It was a lovely walk with beautiful views. A group of adults and children passed us. They had started in Mitzpe and walked down on this trail. To do this you have to have someone pick you up at the highway. Maybe there is a bus. I’ll look into this next time. If we had an earlier start we could have walked out further and turned back before the steep climb up the ridge. That would make a good hike.

We drove a few minutes to another site which used to be a quarry. Now it is a lake! A lot of people were there even though it was not hot. By now the wind was picking up and it was getting colder.

Driving back into Mitzpe we saw ibex and several parked cars at the small outlook where the highway reaches the top of the crater, just before the visitor center. I pulled into the outlook and we spent an incredible 40 minutes or so watching several males with huge horns and some young ones as they sat on the rocks overlooking the crater or ate the few bushes. They were curious about the few people watching and would come close but not touch us.

Across the highway from the outlook is a steep, high rock face. Above is the hotel. We saw several ibex on top of this and watched them climb down then cross the road (it isn’t busy). Amazing. I took a video and will upload it.

My question. Where are the females? Home making dinner? Lately we’ve only seen old males with huge horns and young ones. Maybe we are not recognising the females. Must learn more about ibex.







 

Pauline

Forums Admin
Joe sent me the answer to my question a couple of weeks ago, but I just read the article now.

Times of Israel Blog - The remarkable return of the ibex
The ancient wild goats that dominated the Negev were nowhere to be seen for decades; their resurgence is a lesson in what a little planning can accomplish
OCT 16, 2019

From the article: “Male “bachelor” herds, usually keep their distance from the females. But this time of year, they are starting to get a bit frisky, as hormones start to rise. Summer is past. Time to celebrate together.”

So, we are seeing male herds.
 

ItalophileNJ

100+ Posts
You are lucky to see the cisterns full of water - they were probably dry until the end of October, when a lot of rain fell over this area (the night of 26-27th).
Maybe on one of your next visits you can be in the desert parts of the country later on in winter, or early spring, and you might be able to see the flowering display that this desert can (sometimes) put on.

BTW the pistachio tree you saw is not the same species as the one we all know of with the edible nuts. The one in this part of the desert is the Pistacia atlantica. They are protected in Israel, some of them are hundreds of years old.

The woman in the full burka was probably Bedouin - when you exit Mitzpeh to the north you will see their small villages and encampments.

The Jewish religious women with the turbans are just sort of Jewish-nationalist, as opposed to the ultra-orthodox (Haredi), not necessarily of any sect. They don't have any problem living alongside or even amongst secular Jews, although of course they will prefer neighborhoods with a more religious population. Secular neighborhoods are quite wary of potential increases in residents that are more religious, for fear that the character of the area could change for "worse".

The Marrakesh Hummus place is relatively new, not more than a year perhaps. Lasha is indeed a great bakery.

You're right, there is a nice vibe to the town. Too bad it hasn't managed to develop to its full potential over the years - you saw how empty the "Spice Quarter" is. There was a very good cafe there, but it closed, and there are very few small businesses that manage to hold out.
Re the women’s head coverings: The carefully wound scarves, or “tichels” are, as Joe says, the regular head coverings of the religious ( or religious nationalist) women. My most elegant religious cousins have gorgeously wound scarves but when they are all dressed up, they wear wigs. I’ve only gradually come to understand the messages of head coverings, for men and women.

Enjoy Shabbat in Mitzpe Ramon!
 

Pauline

Forums Admin
I have so much to learn about Israel!

This is what I find looking for tichels:

The women here all wear the same head covering and it is more turban-like. Here I took from behind. Maybe they are just a variation of a tichel.

DFC205D3-A1A5-4934-A459-482997A773CD.jpeg


58918518-C692-4D83-889F-B7790E12F2A4.jpeg
 

Pauline

Forums Admin
Today's Ibex video. We were walking out of En Avdat National Park when we spotted an Ibex in the wadi just off the trail. We went out to watch and stood there for 10+ minutes while a herd of Ibex walked around us. The park was full of people but no one noticed the Ibex for quite awhile, so we had them to ourselves. Until a family with very loud children arrived. They did not scare off the Ibex though!

There were 3 males with big horns, many young ones, and some females. They were drinking water and eating the bushes as they made their way slowly down the wadi.

View: https://youtu.be/A2gxdbFPmBg
 

Pauline

Forums Admin
Saturday November 16 2019
A bit overcast and warm, 68F

Our last day in Mitzpe Ramon and our last Ibex photos (I promise).

We drove north about 20 minutes to the upper entrance of En Avdat National Park. Last year we did a quick visit to the lower entrance and this year we wanted to see more. At the upper entrance there is not much to do except walk out to a view point where you look down into the canyon.

From the lower entrance you can hike the length of the canyon (less than a mile) and then climb stairs and ladders straight up the canyon wall to where we were standing at the upper entrance. You cannot return by going down - this trail is one way from the start of the climb. I am never going to be able to climb up that cliff face so I thought looking down from above would be fun, and it was. We looked straight down to the grove of popular trees where we would be standing an hour later.

Before going to the lower entrance we walked out along a short trail on the upper part of the wadi, to a pool of water. There were a few other people about but not many.

We drove to the lower entrance, which took a good 15 minutes on the highway and then on a road that snaked down the canyon. We ate our lunch sitting on the edge of our open car trunk which was strangely peaceful even though there were a lot of families about.

We joined the families and walked into the canyon. We had walked this last year, but this year we climbed up the steep and narrow and wet steps to the upper level of the canyon and back to the poplar tree grove and the start of the climb up, looking up to where we had been an hour ago.

A park ranger was sitting on the steps telling people it was one way only and it was not going to be easy to get back to your car from the top (a 6km walk back on other trails). We spoke to her for a bit.

On our way back we ran into her on the trail and she pointed out several vultures that live in the cliffs. The park feeds them and are encouraging them to stay there. Unfortunately we were talking to her at a narrow point of the trail and she was standing on a rock right near the edge and all I could think was "don't anyone fall!!" I did manage to look up and see the vultures. They are huge. I did not take a photo because I would have had to let go of the rock I was cowering against.

As we were leaving the park we spotted a young ibex about 30 feet off the trail. We pushed through the bushes to watch and there was a herd of them. Three males with huge horns, some smaller females and about 10 young ones. They were walking along the Wadi, eating bushes, having a drink. They were all around us. One young one stood on a rock near us and watched us. It was incredible.

After about 10 minutes other people came to watch and the spell was broken so we left. Almost at the car we saw one last ibex up above us on the rocks.

Packing up tonight and driving north tomorrow.








 

ItalophileNJ

100+ Posts
I have so much to learn about Israel!

This is what I find looking for tichels:

The women here all wear the same head covering and it is more turban-like. Here I took from behind. Maybe they are just a variation of a tichel.

Just one more comment on the head-covering thing: It's not just religious Israeli women who wear tichels, snoods, wigs, etc. Many Orthodox Jewish women all over world wear various sorts of coverings that completely cover their own hair. You can see them all over, but particularly in certain neighborhoods. There are two different NJ kosher supermarkets that I sometimes shop in, in two different towns about 10 miles apart: One seems to have a preponderance of women in tichels and the other has more women wearing wigs or snoods. The second one, in West Orange, seems more modern Orthodox to me. And of course there are lots of people from my own egalitarian synagogue community shopping there, peopl who keep kosher etc and are pants-wearing and bare-headed.

Looking forward to your next post from Zichron Ya'akov: Coincidentally I had Shabbat dinner at a friend's house the other night and one of the other guests now lives full time in Zichron. She and her (ex) husband had bought a second home therre, at least partly because of the thriving Conservative/Masort synagogue there, and now she has made aliyah and was just back for a short visit to NJ.
 

Pauline

Forums Admin
Sunday November 17 2019 - Zikhron Ya’akov
Sunny and 73F in Zikhron, windy

What a difference a three hour drive makes! We are in Zikhron Ya’akov, a small town (23,000) at the southern end of the Carmel Mountains, 22 miles south of Haifa. It is greener here and more densely populated. The Mediterranean Sea is a couple of miles away. This is an upscale town with lots of shops and restaurants. It is one of the Rothschild towns (like Rosh Pinna) founded in the 1882 by Jewish Pioneers from Romania.

@Amy told me about this town when we were planning our first trip. We spent one night here on our March trip and decided to spend more time here. We’ve got 10 nights and then we go home.

The ibex did not come out to say goodbye this morning, even though we went looking for them. It was windy in Mitzpe and very windy for the whole drive. On the highway from Mitzpe to Beersheva there are frequent “watch for camels” signs on the road. We saw many Bedouin villages with goats and donkeys, but just before Beersheva we finally saw a couple of camels loose in a field near the road.

Traffic was thick once we got near Beersheva. We drove on highway 6, the toll road. It is electronic and the car rental company charges us.

Checkin was 3pm so we stopped for lunch in Pardes Hanna-Karkur, a town 20 minutes from Zikhron. I read about this restaurant, Elhanan Bread Culture, in an article and we went here on our March trip. It is a lovely casual place on the edge of the town with outdoor tables. It is a bakery and has a small menu for breakfast and lunch. I had hummus with chickpeas and salad - fabulous. Steve had Sabich, potato, eggplant, hard boiled egg. Also fabulous. Both served with their good bread. It was good to decompress sitting under the trees after that intense drive.

We got to cottage at 3pm, met the owner and settled in. It is a pretty stone cottage in a garden behind the owner’s house. The rental we had in Mitzpe had 2 hangers for clothes - 2! This cottage has about 20. Plus chests of drawers. My main complaint about the Mitzpe rental was that there was nowhere to unpack your clothes. We had a huge bedroom with a bed and a sofa bed, so all the clothes were heaped on the sofa bed. In this cottage we can unpack!

We did a short walk around. We are a few blocks from the Main Street and a big supermarket. Good location. I have a lot of laundry to do because everything is dusty from the desert and we had no washer in Mitzpe (and no drying rack that I might have used with hand washing).

As much as I loved Mitzpe I was happy to leave this morning. We had 11 nights in the Negev, starting in Ein Gedi, and I’m ready to be in a more populated area. Desert sand is everywhere, covering our car, imbedded in my shoes, on my clothes.





 

Pauline

Forums Admin
Monday November 18 2019
Sunny and warm, 73F

An easy day today. We drove out to a nearby park, Ramat HaNadiv. We were there in April and it was too muddy to hike so we wandered in the lovely gardens. This time we did a hike. At the information center they sell you brochures for each of the three hikes.

We started out on the shortest hike but soon reached a big group of school kids on the trail, so went back and started again. This time we chose the longest hike, which turned out to be only 2 miles. It took us an hour and a half because it was a rocky and slow going trail, plus there were several viewpoints and one large ruins to view.

The trail was beautiful, going through bushy areas, open fields and woods. It went out to the edge of the cliff that the park sits on, with views up and down the coast. I could see Tel Aviv about an hour drive south, and Haifa a 30 minute drive north.

Along the cliff edge are the ruins of a Second Temple (1st century) farm with a Byzantine (4th - 7th century) villa built on top. There was a Second Temple ritual bath (mikvah), many walls of the villa, a threshing floor. There were two groups of teenagers when we got there but they left soon after we arrived and hiked faster than us because we did not come across them again. They had one student on a special hiking wheelchair! We came across only one or two other people on the trail.

After the hike we went to the supermarket in Zikhron. Our host told us it was recently remodelled and had a good organic section. It did! To get a shopping cart you enter your passport number into a panel and then take the cart. At least that is what the security guy at the entrance told us. Since we are not Israeli we couldn’t do this. He got some thing he scanned to let us take a cart. Is it possible that people enter a passport number for a cart? Or do they scan an ID card? I will ask someone about this. Much more complicated than the euro coin used in much of Europe.

By the time we got home and made lunch the day was almost over (3pm). The days are so short this time of year. It makes for restful travel because you can’t do too much in a day. I sat in the garden with my audible book and knitting for awhile and then we strolled into town. This time we explored most of the main shopping street. (Yesterday we mostly explored the Italian-style ice cream shop because I was in meltdown after the drive and getting setup in yet another place. The ice cream did the trick.) Today we found an excellent fruit and vegetable shop, a place selling nuts (we got some), a good looking falafel place, and a bakery. Places that we won’t need to use include two US pizza chains and several clothing shops.

It was dark by the time we got home (5pm).



 

joe

500+ Posts
To get a shopping cart you enter your passport number into a panel and then take the cart. At least that is what the security guy at the entrance told us. Since we are not Israeli we couldn’t do this. He got some thing he scanned to let us take a cart. Is it possible that people enter a passport number for a cart? Or do they scan an ID card? I will ask someone about this. Much more complicated than the euro coin used in much of Europe.

Yes unfortunately that is true in some supermarket chains - it is their way to deal with the problem here of carts being stolen, or not returned from the parking lot. The damage incurred to the supermarkets is the financial cost of buying new carts, plus the temporary lack of carts available to customers. Apparently the chain managers think that the problem is so bad that this method is worth both the cost of implementation and the dissatisfaction of customers who say this is an invasion of privacy.
 

Pauline

Forums Admin
Tuesday November 19 2019
Sunny and warm, 73F, not as windy.

Today we did a lovely hike, the Muhraka Hike in the Carmel Forest (from the Israel by Foot website). Erez who runs the website sent me a list of hikes in this area and thought we would like this one. @joe recommended hiking in this area when we were here in May but it was too muddy to hike.

We drove up to the Deir Al-Mukhraqa Carmelite Monastery, 30 minutes north of Zikhron, south of the big Druze town Daliyat El Carmel. We parked outside the monastery which was already filling up with tour buses. This is a tour bus destination. Old Testament stories about the Prophet Elijah are thought to have taken place here. On the hike we went by ruins from a Jewish Settlement from the 2nd to 6th century. Read more on the Israel by Foot website.

The hike was really nice, 5 miles long that took us 3 hours because it was rocky and slow going in parts, and we stopped frequently. The first part was through a tree covered hillside on a rocky trail. The ruins were in this area. Then we went down a beautiful treed Wadi. Such a contrast to hiking in the Negev. Here is is green and almost lush. The last half of the hike was on a wide dirt road with great views.

We saw wild boars. They were ahead of us on the path, 2 or 3 adults and 7 young ones. They were crossing the dirt road. When they saw us they ran up the hillside. Those 7 little ones ran flat out and were so cute. I got a few photos but even with the zoom they were too far away.

The last 20 minutes of the hike were killer! Straight up a rocky hillside, at least 1000 feet, scrambling over rocks. There was always a place to put your foot and we each had one hiking pole and we made it, but it was hard. It shows me how much my knee has healed. It didn’t hurt and isn’t hurting now.

We had planned on visiting the monastery but there were 6 tour buses and it was too crowded. Two more buses arrived as we were leaving.

In Israel you are not often hassled by people to buy something, which I really like. The worst experience we had was crossing the checkpoint into Bethlehem on another trip where the taxi drivers almost body-block you to get your attention. Today a guy was sitting in his car in the parking area trying to get people to eat at some restaurant (that’s my guess). He called us over and asked if we had eaten. Steve said yes and we walked on. Then he came over to our car when we were taking off our packs and started with “where are you from?” I said that we didn’t need anything. He turned away and said “bad people” in English. We just finished re-watching season 2 of Shtisel and one guy always says “damned evil people” when he doesn’t get what he wants.

Anyway, home by 3:30 and we were both so exhausted that we took naps! What a climb! But a great hike.




 

Pauline

Forums Admin
Wednesday November 20 2019
Sunny and warm, low 70sF

We started the day with a short hike, back at Ramat HaNadiv. This time we did the main shorter route that goes to some good Roman ruins by a spring. You can see the bath complex and the aqueduct from the spring, which filled a pool by the baths. The aqueduct still runs with water. The walk was only 1.2 miles.

From there we drove about 20 minutes to the coast, to Ceasaria National Park. This is a very good archaeological site on the seaside. We did not explore the whole sit because we visited last year. Instead we had a long lovely lunch with SlowTrav/SlowEurope member @berliej (Berlie) and her husband Sam. We sat outside looking onto the water. I had a good eggplant and tahini dish, Steve had fish which he thought very good, Berlie and Sam had fish & chips! We ate and talked nonstop about travel - Israel, Italy and France.

It is always fun to meet someone I know from the forums!

After we went to the Zikhron mall which is down by the highway below the town. I hate malls and was expecting a horrible indoor mall but it was pretty casual, outdoor, with a movie theatre and some shops. We were heading to the natural foods shop, not that we needed but just to check it out. It is good and we did end up getting things.

That was our day! A short walk and a long lunch.




 

berliej

10+ Posts
Contest 2019 Winner!
Wednesday November 20 2019
Sunny and warm, low 70sF

We started the day with a short hike, back at Ramat HaNadiv. This time we did the main shorter route that goes to some good Roman ruins by a spring. You can see the bath complex and the aqueduct from the spring, which filled a pool by the baths. The aqueduct still runs with water. The walk was only 1.2 miles.

From there we drove about 20 minutes to the coast, to Ceasaria National Park. This is a very good archaeological site on the seaside. We did not explore the whole sit because we visited last year. Instead we had a long lovely lunch with SlowTrav/SlowEurope member @berliej (Berlie) and her husband Sam. We sat outside looking onto the water. I had a good eggplant and tahini dish, Steve had fish which he thought very good, Berlie and Sam had fish & chips! We ate and talked nonstop about travel - Israel, Italy and France.

It is always fun to meet someone I know from the forums!

After we went to the Zikhron mall which is down by the highway below the town. I hate malls and was expecting a horrible indoor mall but it was pretty casual, outdoor, with a movie theatre and some shops. We were heading to the natural foods shop, not that we needed but just to check it out. It is good and we did end up getting things.

That was our day! A short walk and a long lunch.




Both Sam and I really enjoyed the lunch and meeting you and Steve!
 

Pauline

Forums Admin
Thursday November 21 2019
Sunny and warm, 72F

Today was sunny and warm, as it has been all our time here in Zikhron. In the evening it gets cooler and we have the heat on in the cottage.

We drove down to Habonim Beach on the coast. It is about 15 minutes from here. There are two highways along the coast. Highway 4 goes along on the flat area below the cliffs and hills. Then closer to the coast is highway 2 which is more like an interstate or motorway and goes between Haifa and Tel Aviv. Between highway 2 and the water a stretch about a mile deep with agriculture and some towns. So from highway 2 you are not looking out on the water. It is a bit difficult in this area to get to the water. Up in Haifa they have parks and walkways along the water and the road goes beside them.

Habonim Beach is in a National Park. You exit highway 4, go on a bridge over highway 2, then drive across the train tracks. Then it is a mile or more of rutted out road until you come to a manned booth at the entrance to the park. We paid 36NIS, about $10, to enter and park.

The trail along the water is well marked. I think it only goes south. I have one hiking book that says you can hike all the way to Caesarea where we were yesterday. We did the Israel by Foot version which was from Habonim to Tel Dor and back, 5 miles.

This hike was lovely. It was sunny and warm, with a gentle breeze. The past few days have been windy so we waited for a not windy day for this hike. The water sparkled. The Mediterranean is such a beautiful body of water. We walked close to the water, across a few shell beaches, along interesting rock formations, on scruffy grass areas.

There was one large group of school kids ahead of us and we passed them while they stopped at a beach. I think this was a group of Arab school kids. There are a few large Arab towns nearby. (Israel is very segregated with Arab towns, Druze towns, Jewish towns.) At the end of the hike we saw another big group of school kids.

Tel Dor was the turnaround point. You can drive here. There are remains of a Canaanite port and town which were interesting. The area has not been excavated extensively but you can see a few walls and parts of columns. From Wikipedia: “Scholars who reconcile Bronze and Iron Age history in the Levant with biblical traditions write the following: Dor was an ancient royal city of the Canaanites, (Joshua 12:23) whose ruler was an ally of Jabin king of Hazor against Joshua, (Joshua 11:1,2).”

A great hike and we got back in the afternoon so had time to walk into the center of Zikhron while it was still light out. The main pedestrian mall is short and all galleries, clothing shops or restaurants - nothing that looked interesting to me. Everything interesting is on the block north of the pedestrian street. We stopped for ice cream again. Then into the bakery which is as good as the ones in Jerusalem. Nice bread, pastries, cakes. They will have challah tomorrow (Friday). Next into the candy and nuts shop to buy a bag of mixed nuts. These are as good as the ones we get at the Jerusalem market. After that into the very good fruit and vegetable shop. Everyone was very friendly and the shops are very nice. My opinion of Zikhron just went up quite a bit.

I am happy that we are staying here but am not sure if I like staying here more than in Haifa. It is easier to get out of town for hiking and day trips, but I Haifa has more to do in the town and better food shops and restaurants nearby.









 

Pauline

Forums Admin
Friday November 22 2019
Sunny and warm, 73F

Zihkron recently started a Friday Farmer’s Market. We walked up to the market which was on the pedestrian street. It was interesting. Wine, cheese, olive oil, pickled vegetables, fruit and vegetables, fruit juices. Lots of people wandering around.

After the market we drove 15 minutes north into the hills to Makura Farm, a local olive oil producer. They have new oil and we got 2 litres to take home (105 NIS, $30).

We spent the afternoon sitting in the sun in the garden then went for a walk through town at sunset as Shabbot started. It wasn’t as car free as Jerusalem but people were out walking to the synagogue. The street in front of the synagogue was closed to traffic. As we walked back we saw a beautiful sunset over the sea.


 

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