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Post Your Most Memorable Pics of Italy

NoSpin

100+ Posts
Those are very interesting photos of Venice. I saw many news reports and photos of the flooding, but your photos are much more revealing than what I saw in the media. Also I love the commentary, more than the phots that is what is so interesting. I have read that the new barriers now mostly in place seem to be able to stem the tide (pun intended).

I have some pics of Venice that I'll have to dig out.

BTW, I see a connection between your visits to Venice and acqua alta. Maybe you should consider going to Milano instead! :D
 

JustTravel

1000+ Posts
Contest 2019 Winner!
No thanks on Milano. We have been several times and there's not much for us there. It will always be Venice for us. We have been going to Venice since 1990, first for a few days and then our visits became longer and longer until we spent around three months each year since 2007 (from sometime in October until sometime in January). We lived our normal daily life there for those three months, getting to know friends. Missing Venice a lot. Check out my trip reports for the last three visits if you are interested.
 

ellen

100+ Posts
I guess this could be a church anywhere but it always reminds me of Italy and a day trip to Cinque Terre. This was taken on the way there, at the Chiesa San Pietro Portovenere. I loved the simplicity of this empty church with the stunning, though slightly wilting flowers. It touched me so much (and for so long, this picture is from 2010) that I gave this picture to our florist to recreate for the altar at my mother's funeral.
 

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NoSpin

100+ Posts
Ellen, that is so inspiring. I can totally relate to your sentiments. Far more than the photo itself is the story behind it. What a wonderful tribute to your mother.

(And BTW that is a very artistic photo)
 

joe

500+ Posts
A few more, continuing on the theme of agriturismi, this time from a lovely one a bit north of Verona, where we stayed on our last trip, two years ago. The last one is from the beautiful gulch/ravine just below their farm. The owner (in the photo) and his son even decided to come and visit us and stay in our home for a few days, after hearing our descriptions of our place in the desert :

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NoSpin

100+ Posts
Since we just observed Veteran's Day and some other countries observed Armistice Day, I thought I would post a couple photos of the American cemetery in Tavarnuzze. Last summer we rented a villa in Impruneta which is about 12
miles south of Florence. The villa was up on a hill and one day driving down on our way to Florence we spotted this cemetery with white crosses off in the distance. We had no idea what it was.

It is a US cemetery where many US servicemen and 5 servicewomen who died during the Italian campaign are buried. We visited the one in Normandy during the 75th anniversary of D-Day, and while this one is much smaller, it is no less impressive.
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NoSpin

100+ Posts
Nice little story Joe. That is so cool that they came and stayed with you.

However, I don't see any pics of you working in the orchard/vineyard/fields! :D
 

joe

500+ Posts
However, I don't see any pics of you working in the orchard/vineyard/fields! :D

No chance! I never upload images of myself to social media or anything. Sort of a last attempt in this day and age to maintain a bit of anonymity.....:)

About working on these agriturismi : I always offer to help, and I can completely understand why I usually hear "thanks very much, but there's no need...". Sometimes, indeed, there is no need, things are quiet on the farm. And sometimes, if it's the first time we are at the place, the owners don't want the trouble of thinking about what problems could arise, and if it's worth the time to teach somebody something for just a few hours. Completely understandable, I feel the same way sometimes when someone offers to help me.

However, sometimes, after a second visit and after getting to know us, things loosen up, and then if there's something going on that doesn't task them too much to add another worker, they let me join in. In this way I have joined olive and chestnut harvesting, removed stones and dirt from hazelnuts as they pile up in containers, and even removed horse dung from a stable.

Working a bit on a holiday is completely different from working at home. It's fun! ;)
 
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NoSpin

100+ Posts
Joe, I was having fun with you, but I understand exactly what you are saying. In the time they would have to take to teach you how to do something, they could do it themselves in half the time, and better!

On occasion I have offered to help someone and I've told them give me the most unskilled job you have and I'll try not to screw it up! :D
 

Fedina

10+ Posts
Nice little story Joe. That is so cool that they came and stayed with you.

However, I don't see any pics of you working in the orchard/vineyard/fields! :D
Joe, That is amazing that they came to stay with you! We have invited people to come and stay, but they never have! And, NoSpin, wonderful photos. Somehow, we have never been to the US cemetery and I would love to go to Normandy! Maybe when this awful time is over!!!

Seeing this makes me think of a couple things. One is a small town high in the Apuan Alps, called Vinca, near the larger Lunigiana town of Fivizanno. It is known for the Vinca Massacre where 160+ people, women, children and elderly, were murdered in Vinca by the Nazi's. For 3 days they burned villages in the area too. Although the commanding officer was later tried and found guilty, most of them never really served much time despite the killing and destruction they did. Terrible.

The second thing this brings to mind is a statue we saw in a Lunigiana town called Mulazzo. My mother's family comes from the Lunigiana in Northern Tuscany. It's a wonderful rugged, mountainous place that we return to whenever we can. In Mulazzo, there is a statue from WWII that we found striking. It depicts several things that the local people of this area experienced during the war. The Nazi's took control and there was extensive bombing by the Allies. There were also anti fascist / anti Nazi partisans as well as Allied soldiers hiding out in the mountains there. Local people sacrificed, at great personal risk, sheltering or providing food to those hiding out. The depiction of a woman sneakily handing off a loaf of bread really is an intense symbol of their courage and sacrifice. Have you ever read "Love and War in the Appenines" by Eric Newby? It is really an interesting read. There were thousands of people hiding out in the mountains. These mountains are steep and difficult.
 

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joe

500+ Posts
In Mulazzo, there is a statue from WWII that we found striking. It depicts several things that the local people of this area experienced during the war. The Nazi's took control and there was extensive bombing by the Allies. There were also anti fascist / anti Nazi partisans as well as Allied soldiers hiding out in the mountains there. Local people sacrificed, at great personal risk, sheltering or providing food to those hiding out.

Actually, the same man who hosted us at the agriturismo near Verona, told me the amazing story of an Italian-Jewish woman who joined the partisans in WWII and met a tragic and valiant death in a last stand in the hills north of Verona. Her name was Rita Rosani, and she was one of 15 citizens of Verona who received the national Gold Medal of Military Valor after the war (and after her death). I hadn't been aware until then of this woman and her contribution to the Italian resistance.
In spite of Mussolini's rise and popularity in WWII, there are many such accounts of the Italian resistance and bravery in face of the fascists. The Italians have a lot to be proud of.
 

joe

500+ Posts
Five more pics from me, all vineyards in Piemonte, taken during our last trip to that region, 2016. October is simply a great time to visit there, you have many harvests going on : grapes, hazelnuts, truffles, pumpkins, chestnuts, corn, rice, olives, and more.

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Alpinista

100+ Posts
Since we just observed Veteran's Day and some other countries observed Armistice Day, I thought I would post a couple photos of the American cemetery in Tavarnuzze. Last summer we rented a villa in Impruneta which is about 12
miles south of Florence. The villa was up on a hill and one day driving down on our way to Florence we spotted this cemetery with white crosses off in the distance. We had no idea what it was.

It is a US cemetery where many US servicemen and 5 servicewomen who died during the Italian campaign are buried. We visited the one in Normandy during the 75th anniversary of D-Day, and while this one is much smaller, it is no less impressive.
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We always make a point of visiting the plots of the Medal of Honor recipients at the American cemeteries -- there is usually a description of the actions of the award recipient's actions at the visitors' center. We've always noted the difference between the American cemeteries and the orderly rows of markers and the British cemeteries with their individualized stones.
 

Fedina

10+ Posts
We always make a point of visiting the plots of the Medal of Honor recipients at the American cemeteries -- there is usually a description of the actions of the award recipient's actions at the visitors' center. We've always noted the difference between the American cemeteries and the orderly rows of markers and the British cemeteries with their individualized stones.
How do you research the Medal of Honor recipient sites? Haven't done that, but would very much like to see them.
 

Alpinista

100+ Posts
How do you research the Medal of Honor recipient sites? Haven't done that, but would very much like to see them.

We have found information at the visitor centers at the cemeteries we've visited. I had the honor of meeting the oldest living Medal winner from Iwo Jima, Woody Williams, two years ago at a military function being held in a hotel where we were staying in West Virginia -- was very hesitant to go introduce myself since I had only a stateside stint in the Army and he was one of the greatest of his era serving in the Marines in the South Pacific and had gone on to do magnificent work in veteran-related charities, but he was a wonderfully kind person to talk to.
 

GailS

100+ Posts
A year ago, September, vineyards of Castello Nipozzano just east of Florence in the Rufina DOCG. We have a friend whose property abuts the estate. We visit them every year - except this year. Nipozzano Chianti is always staple in our cellar for an everyday wine.
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Colo

500+ Posts
Contest 2019 Winner!
Walking down the walled streets of Siena, a young girl pops her head out the window two stories above us to screech with excitement. A parade is starting and the music was calling all to follow. I was lucky enough to have the right lens on my camera, and I did not even look through the viewfinder. Literally, just pointed and shot. It is a personal favorite.

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